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Figure trivia/knowledge exchange #01
rgch
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Posted: Wednesday, January 18, 2006 - 11:23 PM UTC
Up to you Faust......by 1 minute!

Epi....what is the answer to the combat patch size?
Epi
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Posted: Wednesday, January 18, 2006 - 11:35 PM UTC
Im sorry Rob.

"And if a combat patch is worn on the right sleeve, what is the measurements for it and the US Flag."

I should of written it like this:
"And if a combat patch is worn on the right sleeve, what is the placement measurement for it and the US Flag?"
FAUST
#130
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Posted: Wednesday, January 18, 2006 - 11:35 PM UTC
Ok ... yesss I finally won something :-) :-)

Ok I have a question from the napoleonic times. Actually on of the very small shreds of knowledge I have about this period of history.

Everybody knows that the march through Russia of Napoleon stopped in the middle of winter and the Russian started to fight back. They were better suited and clothed for the cold circumstances the fights took place in. So Napoleons forces started to retreat. Next to the fact that the clothes were not suitable for winter conditions there was another aspect of the clothes which made the retreat harder then it already was. Some historians even say it is due to these things that Napoleon lost the war in Russia.

My question: Which pieces of the uniforms were it that caused the troubles And how was it possible for these things to cause the troubles.

Looking forward to the answers. I got this information from a popular science magazine here in Holland. It remained in my memory ever since...

DaveCox
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Posted: Thursday, January 19, 2006 - 02:51 AM UTC
I read that the bodies found in the Vilnus mass-graves had traces of lead, so I would guess that the uniform blue dye contained lead as the button would be too small a contact surface?
Plasticbattle
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Posted: Thursday, January 19, 2006 - 04:01 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I read that the bodies found in the Vilnus mass-graves had traces of lead, so I would guess that the uniform blue dye contained lead as the button would be too small a contact surface?


Another theory was that all buttons and items of such were made of tin, and these turned to powder under the extreme cold conditions, therefore exposing the soldiers even more.
Disease was rampant also ... lice carried them and resulted in diseases like trench foot. Something to do with the huge bearskin head gear??
Kinggeorges
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Posted: Thursday, January 19, 2006 - 03:32 PM UTC
Hi does it related to meanly bugs and genital bugs, due to their underwears ?
Don't laugh, I'm serious ! :-) :-)
FAUST
#130
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Posted: Friday, January 20, 2006 - 08:31 AM UTC
Ola Guys

Well Frank was the one who got it right. The Buttons and buckles were made of Tin and due to the extreme cold of the Russian winter it became terribly brittle and Therefor they turned into powder without much problems. Imagine trying to retreat in the Russian Winter with your pants on your knees

Frank is up for the next question

Tarok
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Posted: Monday, January 23, 2006 - 03:50 PM UTC
Bump...

C'mon Frank... still thinking of a question? :-)
Tarok
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Posted: Friday, February 03, 2006 - 07:02 PM UTC
Alrighty... in the interests of keeping this going... I'm going to pose the next question - I'm sure Frank won't mind...

"According to 18th century documentation, how many yards of material for kilts was considered sufficient for a soldier and how many for a sergeant?"

This is a pretty easy question, so you need to get both values correct...
DaveCox
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Posted: Friday, February 03, 2006 - 10:30 PM UTC
6 yards for a soldier & 8 yards for a sergeant.
Tarok
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Posted: Saturday, February 04, 2006 - 03:38 PM UTC

Quoted Text

6 yards for a soldier & 8 yards for a sergeant.



Hi Dave,

Not quite...

Hint: the answer can be found in Osprey's "Wellington's Highlanders"...
DaveCox
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Posted: Saturday, February 04, 2006 - 08:00 PM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

6 yards for a soldier & 8 yards for a sergeant.



Hi Dave,

Not quite...

Hint: the answer can be found in Osprey's "Wellington's Highlanders"...



They were the only two lengths for male kilts that I could find on the net, and no mention of any differentation between the kilts for different ranks, so it was pretty much a guess anyway. _ Guess the winner will have to own that book!?
BadBoyFLSTC
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Posted: Tuesday, February 14, 2006 - 07:23 AM UTC
3 yards for a soldier & 4-5 yards for a sergeant.
Tarok
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Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2006 - 12:02 AM UTC

Quoted Text

3 yards for a soldier & 4-5 yards for a sergeant.



Close enough.

According to the text:

"Surviving 18th century documentation relating to the provision of material for kilts indicated that 3.5 yards was considered sufficient for a soldier and 4 yards for a sergeant. In contrast a modern kilt normally required 7 or 8 yards of material, though this is largely swallowed up in the deep folds of knife-pleating"

Over to you Nils.
BadBoyFLSTC
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Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2006 - 05:46 AM UTC
LOL, ok I'll give it a go. I must say that you all are the masters compared to me though.
The symbol of the Chief Petty Officer in the US Navy is the fouled anchor. Where did this symbol originate?
DaveCox
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Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2006 - 11:34 AM UTC
The fouled anchor as a naval insignia got its start as the seal of the Lord Howard of Effingham.
He was the Lord Admiral of England at the time of the defeat of the Spanish Armada in 1588. The U.S. Navy's adoption of this symbol and many other customs can be directly attributed to the influence of British Naval tradition, in the Royal Navy it's the badge of a Petty Officer.
BadBoyFLSTC
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Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2006 - 06:02 PM UTC
Dave you are right on. I didn't think it would take this group long to get it.

Your go Dave
DaveCox
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Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2006 - 06:14 PM UTC
Which four regiments make up todays Royal Green Jackets?
Tarok
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Posted: Thursday, March 02, 2006 - 09:44 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Which four regiments make up todays Royal Green Jackets?



Bit slow on this one, but the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry (43rd & 52nd), The Kings Royal Rifle Corps and the Rifle Brigade?
DaveCox
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Posted: Thursday, March 02, 2006 - 09:59 PM UTC
Exactly right Rudi. The KRRC of course was once the 60th, and the Rifle Brigade the original 95th.

Your go mate!
Tarok
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Posted: Thursday, March 02, 2006 - 10:05 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Exactly right Rudi. The KRRC of course was once the 60th, and the Rifle Brigade the original 95th.

Your go mate!



Wooohoooo!

My brains pretty fried after this week... :-)

Next person to read this post can give it a bash!
Marty
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Posted: Thursday, March 02, 2006 - 11:51 PM UTC
I'll give it a shot...

What was the name of the home-made machine gun Polish home army used during the Warsaw Uprising in 1944?

I will accept either of the two names.

Bonus question...How many were manufactured?
whodini
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Posted: Sunday, March 05, 2006 - 06:43 AM UTC
aye...

It was the polish STEN gun made in underground workshops.

Am I right?

EDIT and 11,00 were produced.
SkateOrDie
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Posted: Sunday, March 05, 2006 - 06:55 AM UTC
the sten was made by the brits but many other groups made copy that would be worth crap
whodini
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Posted: Sunday, March 05, 2006 - 06:59 AM UTC
My answer came from wikipedia... Lol