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Photography
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Amateur Photo help
scgatgbi
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Florida, United States
Joined: May 28, 2009
KitMaker: 285 posts
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Posted: Friday, June 05, 2009 - 04:01 AM UTC
Greetings to all,
Could use some help here. I've pretty much just gotten back into the whole modelling/painting thing and I'm not happy with how my pictures turn out. I don't have the space, time, or $ to do any elaborate set-ups so I'm at a bit of a disadvantage. I've got 2 canon powershots (forget at the moment which ones) that I use, but for a photo area I'm usually stuck using my kitchen counter (white micca) and my kitchen has the flourecent lights. My pics tend to reflect too much of the white from the counters & I tend to loose a lot of detail in the shots. anybody out there have any simple tips to help offset these issues? It needs to be simple, easy to store/hide (the "boss" barely puts up with having my modeling gear within easy reach, adding any more bulky stuff is out of the question, chuckle), and use simple easy to find materials. I've heard using colored construction paper behind or around the model will help, but ????? any & all help is greatly appreciated.

Sean
CMOT
Staff MemberEditor-in-Chief
ARMORAMA
_VISITCOMMUNITY
England - South West, United Kingdom
Joined: May 14, 2006
KitMaker: 10,955 posts
Historicus Forma: 58 posts
Posted: Friday, June 05, 2009 - 04:58 AM UTC
Just place the item being photographed onto plain craft paper, blue seems to work best.
scgatgbi
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Florida, United States
Joined: May 28, 2009
KitMaker: 285 posts
Historicus Forma: 0 posts
Posted: Friday, June 05, 2009 - 05:01 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Just place the item being photographed onto plain craft paper, blue seems to work best.



just as a base or behind it as a backdrop as well? Thanks..
mvfrog
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California, United States
Joined: August 25, 2008
KitMaker: 369 posts
Historicus Forma: 3 posts
Posted: Friday, June 05, 2009 - 08:09 AM UTC
Get a large piece, and 'roll' it up behind the model, and it will form a 'floor' and a backdrop without wall/floor seam. Also, adjust the white balance for the fluorescent lighting and you should see a real difference with the colors. Not tough to do; you should enjoy the results.

Matt
exer
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Dublin, Ireland
Joined: November 27, 2004
KitMaker: 6,048 posts
Historicus Forma: 446 posts
Posted: Friday, June 05, 2009 - 11:51 AM UTC
I have a Canon powershot and good photos can be taken with it.
For best results take your photos outside in the shade with the sloped construction paper as a background. Set the camera to take photos in the largest format possible. This means you can be some distance away which will let you focus better and give you a greater depth of field. You can crop and resize the photos later on even the simplest programmes like "Paint" which most PCs have.

If you're taking photos indoors use a tripod -even a small one like this



Mine cost me 5

Use the self timer on the camera to eliminate camera shake.

If you want to do a little more work I recommend this article:


[url=http://strobist.blogspot.com/2006/07/how-to-diy-10-macro-photo-studio.html[/url]

and this one which also explains how to position your background for the best result.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Light-Studio-for-Photographers-Tabletop/

scgatgbi
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Florida, United States
Joined: May 28, 2009
KitMaker: 285 posts
Historicus Forma: 0 posts
Posted: Tuesday, June 09, 2009 - 01:25 AM UTC
Thanks, I'll give it a shot. I know natural light tend to get the best reults. I'll have to find one of those tripods. Thanks for the links.
HARV
#012
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Wyoming, United States
Joined: November 07, 2003
KitMaker: 3,094 posts
Historicus Forma: 300 posts
Posted: Tuesday, June 23, 2009 - 08:22 AM UTC
Hi Sean,

I also use a blue background. You can take a look at my photos if you like and you will see how they turn out (PS - I am not the best photographer).

I bought a piece of blue posterboard and use it. Some of the pictures I take with it flat on my work bench. Other times I will clip it to my paint rack to give it kind of a half moon curve to form a background so that I can take a straight on photo.

With the camera I use it ends up making the blue look gray and it doesn't look too bad I guess.

Hope that helps.

HARV
scgatgbi
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Florida, United States
Joined: May 28, 2009
KitMaker: 285 posts
Historicus Forma: 0 posts
Posted: Tuesday, June 23, 2009 - 08:40 AM UTC
Harv,
Thanks, I checked out your photos & it makes a big difference. I've tried some light blue construction paper & it seems to help. I need to grab some bigger sheets of it. It deffinitely helps cut down on the white glare I was getting before. Thanks!!!
HARV
#012
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Wyoming, United States
Joined: November 07, 2003
KitMaker: 3,094 posts
Historicus Forma: 300 posts
Posted: Thursday, June 25, 2009 - 03:43 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Harv,
Thanks, I checked out your photos & it makes a big difference. I've tried some light blue construction paper & it seems to help. I need to grab some bigger sheets of it. It deffinitely helps cut down on the white glare I was getting before. Thanks!!!



You're welcome, I'm glad that I could be of some help.

Thanks,

HARV