login   |    register
Photography
Questions about shooting your models and dioramas? Ask here.
playing with my new photobooth and camera
montythefirst
_VISITCOMMUNITY
England - South West, United Kingdom
Joined: August 04, 2007
KitMaker: 1,055 posts
Historicus Forma: 601 posts
Posted: Friday, November 26, 2010 - 12:44 PM UTC
hi guys

i only have a cheap camera can't afford a decent one, but i did get a decent photo booth setup off ebay

here are some of the results what do you think any tips hints

adjusted




not adjusted









cheers

Simon

robot_
_VISITCOMMUNITY
United Kingdom
Joined: March 08, 2009
KitMaker: 719 posts
Historicus Forma: 0 posts
Posted: Thursday, December 02, 2010 - 03:40 AM UTC
Hi Simon,

If I understand correctly, this photo booth is of the light-tent variety? I.e. a 5-sided cube-like shape, with the 6th face open for the camera?

These are usually used to get shadowless photos on a pure white background, for product photography, etc. They are particularly useful for very shiny things, like jewellery, as they will have less distracting things in the reflections.

The light source in your photos looks like it is coming through the opening that is used for the camera. This way, it is not being diffused by the white material of the tent.

Do you use a tripod? Without one, things are a bit more limited, so improvise with a pile of books or similar. Basically you want to remove the influence of camera movement and free yourself to use as long an exposure as needed. If you are using an improvise camera support, you will probably have to use the self timer so that your hand pressing the shutter does not vibrate the camera during the exposure.

First, set the ISO to be fixed at it's lowest setting, and disable any on-board flash. If you camera has a long enough exposure capability (2 seconds or so), you can start without any additional lighting (just the room lights, or preferably daylight from a window). This way, the white fabric of the tent should be the brightest thing in the frame, and you can adjust the exposure with the exposure compensation (usually labelled in EV steps) until it is a clean white background. If the camera is using its slowest shutter speed already, it may look too dark as it can't do anything to get more light in. In that case, you'll have to use extra lights. Start with the light above the tent, and positioned so that none comes straight in through the front opening of the tent. The light should bounce around inside the tent and give subtle shadows, they shouldn't look as dark as in the photos you have posted.

After you have mastered the single light above, you can add other lights (try to keep them the same light temperature- i.e. colour, so all halogens, all normal tungsten bulbs, all the same type of fluorescence lamp, etc.)- but again avoid any direct lighting. If you want light to come in from the front, drape a white cloth (or kitchen roll, anything to diffuse the light) over the opening, leaving just enough room for the camera, and place the light so that is has to pass through the diffuser before entering the tent.

Good luck, and let us know how you get on.
HawkeyeV
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Wisconsin, United States
Joined: September 20, 2006
KitMaker: 319 posts
Historicus Forma: 0 posts
Posted: Thursday, December 02, 2010 - 04:40 AM UTC
You might find this article useful.
http://hawkeyes-squawkbox.com/2010/06/03/encore-scale-modeling-photography/

You don't seem to have enough light. You also have to be keen on the lightbox's seams and folds as they will ruin an otherwise good shot.

Also using some post editing software to pull the object being photographed out of the background is also a nice resource to have as well.

SSgtWhite
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Montana, United States
Joined: November 17, 2010
KitMaker: 26 posts
Historicus Forma: 0 posts
Posted: Tuesday, December 07, 2010 - 08:03 AM UTC
Looks good.

You might try "bouncing" the light. That will kill the shadow behind him. just add a white panel above him and bounce the light off it -- like shooting pool -- play with it until the shadow diminishes.

I shoot photos for the AF and have some experience with this.

Adjusting your camera's ISO will produce better results under low light as well, but if you have a less expensive point-and-shoot, a high ISO setting will make the photo grainy.

Anyway, I really dig the picture -- awesome figure!
montythefirst
_VISITCOMMUNITY
England - South West, United Kingdom
Joined: August 04, 2007
KitMaker: 1,055 posts
Historicus Forma: 601 posts
Posted: Thursday, December 09, 2010 - 01:03 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Looks good.

You might try "bouncing" the light. That will kill the shadow behind him. just add a white panel above him and bounce the light off it -- like shooting pool -- play with it until the shadow diminishes.

I shoot photos for the AF and have some experience with this.

Adjusting your camera's ISO will produce better results under low light as well, but if you have a less expensive point-and-shoot, a high ISO setting will make the photo grainy.

Anyway, I really dig the picture -- awesome figure!



thanks for your help

cheers

Simon