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Painting: Painting with Acrylic
Discuss Acrylic painting techniques.
Questions about acrylic paints from Micheals
Wolf-Leader
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New Hampshire, United States
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Posted: Friday, December 30, 2011 - 06:03 PM UTC
Ok I know that I'm most likely just grasping at straws but I figure, sorry for the suttle pun,lol, I would try at least to work with all different mediums just to find out what the hell I feel comfortable with in terms of the type of paint. I tried artist oils based on the book from Verlinden "The Verlinden Way" well I tried that way but my figures definately didnt look like or even close to way Verlinden was talking about.So now I have all these winsor newton tubes of artist oils with nowhere to go.I than vallejo acrylics,works great but I found out that what you get in the bottle seems to dry up to quickly or maybe I'm just not useing them enough,very frustruating.Then I went back to artist oils for awhile seem to be ok with it but still not happy with my results.Now getting really frustrated.I was in Micheals arts and craft store the other day looking for this type of acrylic paint that a good friend of suggested and uses all the time.He told me it was called "Apple barrel" acrylic paints.He told me for the money and what you get in each bottle its worth it.
So,with this in mind can anyone please give me some information pros and cons about this brand of paint?
Thank you
Maki
Staff MemberSenior Editor
ARMORAMA
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Croatia Hrvatska
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Posted: Friday, December 30, 2011 - 07:58 PM UTC
Jody, I must admit I have never heard of this brand of paint nor am I experienced in painting with acrylic paints... but, if you decide to go with oils again, we have some really cool tutorials here that helped me immensly when I started with oils. I really think those are a good start and with some practice you can get really good results. Here are the articles:

Basic of Oil Painting

Mixing Oil Paints

Mixing Oil Paints 2

Painting Faces: Oils over Acrylics

Hope it helps,
Mario
TAFFY3
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New York, United States
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Posted: Saturday, December 31, 2011 - 01:11 AM UTC
Hello Jody, I've been using acrylic paints from Micheal's for years with good results. The ones I use are found in the hobby section and there are several brand names. The ones I use mostly are from FolkArt or Americana. I use them for painting flesh tones all the time. They blend well and have a wide range of colors. I have found that once in a while you'll get a bottle that won't cover well when being brushed on. I don't know if it is because of a manufacturing problem or a shelf life issue. Below is a photo of a bust that I painted using those acrylics. The only exception being the olive drab, I still use Model Master for that Al

http://images17.fotki.com/v308/photos/8/844779/3611571/B17Gunner-vi.jpg
ltb073
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New York, United States
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Posted: Saturday, December 31, 2011 - 01:43 AM UTC
Hi Jody, I have been using mainly acrylic paints from Michaels. They are cheap and every once in a while Michaels will mark them down to 2 for $1.00. I have only 1 bottle of Apple Barrel and don't have much experience with that 1 I mostly use there Craftsmart brand on everything. I even thinned it out a bit with rubbing alcohol and sprayed it through my airbrush with great results
Hope that helps
Plasticbattle
#003
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Donegal, Ireland
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Posted: Saturday, December 31, 2011 - 03:44 AM UTC
I remember quite a few years ago, Anders Heintz made some acrylic tutorials and he also used Apple barrel and/or Folkart paints. He recommended them and the results were well OK!

Some people tend to believe that if they buy whatever a particular modeller recommends, they too will be able to paint as well as he does. Number one on the list is practise, but a very second number two is find a paint or paint medium that you are comfortable with and stick with it. Changing to a new brand/medium wont make that much difference if you are not prepared to put in the ground work! So if these acrylic brands work for you and you´re happy with the results, it doesn´t matter what modeller X uses.
Wolf-Leader
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New Hampshire, United States
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Posted: Saturday, December 31, 2011 - 08:19 PM UTC

Quoted Text

I remember quite a few years ago, Anders Heintz made some acrylic tutorials and he also used Apple barrel and/or Folkart paints. He recommended them and the results were well OK!

Some people tend to believe that if they buy whatever a particular modeller recommends, they too will be able to paint as well as he does. Number one on the list is practise, but a very second number two is find a paint or paint medium that you are comfortable with and stick with it. Changing to a new brand/medium wont make that much difference if you are not prepared to put in the ground work! So if these acrylic brands work for you and you´re happy with the results, it doesn´t matter what modeller X uses.


Hey thank you for the great info, I guess I'm a little impatiant.
Plasticbattle
#003
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Donegal, Ireland
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Posted: Sunday, January 01, 2012 - 02:29 AM UTC
Found one of Ander´s threads from 2003 where he used Folk Art and Appel Barrel acrylics for a face;
How you like this face painted in Acrylics?

Heres another one where he used FA and AB acrylics for the uniform but oils for the face
British Paratrooper Bust Finished!!

Definate proof that Michaels cheaper hobby colours do work. The main dissadvantage is that they dont have military colours, so you´ll have to mix colours to suit. Personally I like this idea ... I use Humbrol enamels, but rarely use any coour direct from the tin ... I prefer to mix a little to get a colour I like.
viper29_ca
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Posted: Sunday, January 01, 2012 - 02:44 AM UTC
You find that Vallejo dries up too quickly in the bottle?

I have some bottles of Vallejo that are going on 10 years old and are just as viscus today as they were when I bought them. Yes sometimes the dropper top gets gunked up with paint (especially black), but they can be taken off and cleaned, but have never had it dry in the bottle on me.
mohammedcohen
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United States
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Posted: Sunday, January 01, 2012 - 07:15 PM UTC
There are a number of books available to guide the beginner and those who have been away from the hobby for some time....one in particular in the late Robert C. (Bob) Knee's "Color Theory & Application", as well as a number of commercial books on color mixing...what is of most importance - and the best possible teacher, is painting...Every figure you paint gives you experience and knowledge...I have had some of the BEST painters (Andrei Koribanics, Bob Knee, Keith Kowalski and Larry Munne) in the hobby as my teachers yet I cannot paint at anywhere near their skill levels...the difference is not the paint, but an innate ability which only a few have...do NOT let this discourage you....Enter as many competitions asa possible - you will find that just about every artist is wiling to share his or her techniques, knowing that mere knowledge of HOW will not make anyone their competitor, but rather continue to grow the hobby...look at the work of others that you admire...closely study their techniques of shading & highlighting...ASK them what medium they use and what coiors give the the best rendition of flesh, Napoleonic blues, reds, SS Camouflage, US OD & modern colors, whatever your interest is....this is how everyone (except the born artists amongst us) operate...NEVER become discouraged!! Keep on truckin' (as the Dead would say)...the more you paint - and subject your work to honest criticism, the better you will become - TIME - it is both our enemy and our friend - you can neither speed it up nor slow it down - will make you bettet. Ffind the medium that you are most comfortable with and stick to it until you master it - do NOT jump from medium to medium...I find that patining or roughing out the eyes in acrylics is easier FOR ME than painting them from scratch in the artist oils that I prefer to use for the rest of the figure...it takes time and effort to find your personal level of comfort...it took me years to find mine through experimentation, trial & error and utter frustration...frustration is the bane of all beginners, just don't give up...EVER!!! Trust me, you will NEVER be satisfied with your work, especially if you compare it with the Masters of the hobby...For years Brahms was frustrated as a young composer because he compared himself to Beethoven...eventually he overcame his frustration and is now among the Pantheon of great composers - it's the same with figure painters...ALL of us are hypercritical of our work...self criticism is good - to a point - WHEN IT BECOMES DESTRUCTIVE TO OUR CREATIVE ABILITY IT CAUSES US TO JUST CHUCK IT - if you don't utterly ENJOY the pasttime it becomes work and WORK Isn't fun. Figure International Magazine is a great source for painters who use acrylics as their medium of choice - find a few back issues and try to pick up some techniques contained in their pages...ands keep painting...if the hobby is causing depression, find another hobby...all of us who are 'into this hobby' do it because it's a source of relaxation, fun and personal accomplishment...I became hooked on it after I got out of the Army in 1974 (YES I'M THAT OLD!!!) I was frustrated because I couldn't get a realistic flesh tone for the 1/35th figures that came with the Tamiya arnmor kits - after a while I lost interest in Armor and began painting figures as a full time hobby - it bacame a 'passion'.

CB in FL
Bluemeanie
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United States
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Posted: Wednesday, July 18, 2012 - 06:26 AM UTC
Hey Guys, I would like to say that in my experience the apple barrel brand paint is not worth it. I've painted lot's of models over the years, mostly monster/figures but some miniatures too. I've always used similar paints from Michaels and Jo-Anne's but usually the Ceramcoat or Americana brands. The apple brand just doesn't cover as well, and always seemed a little cruddy when I tried to thin it.
I hope this helps,
Joshua
JClapp
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Massachusetts, United States
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Posted: Wednesday, July 18, 2012 - 06:47 AM UTC

Quoted Text

There are a number of books available to guide the beginner and those who have been away from the hobby for some time....one in particular in the late Robert C. (Bob) Knee's "Color Theory & Application", as well as a number of commercial books on color mixing...what is of most importance - and the best possible teacher, is painting...Every figure you paint gives you experience and knowledge...I have had some of the BEST painters (Andrei Koribanics, Bob Knee, Keith Kowalski and Larry Munne) in the hobby as my teachers yet I cannot paint at anywhere near their skill levels...the difference is not the paint, but an innate ability which only a few have...do NOT let this discourage you....Enter as many competitions asa possible - you will find that just about every artist is wiling to share his or her techniques, knowing that mere knowledge of HOW will not make anyone their competitor, but rather continue to grow the hobby...look at the work of others that you admire...closely study their techniques of shading & highlighting...ASK them what medium they use and what coiors give the the best rendition of flesh, Napoleonic blues, reds, SS Camouflage, US OD & modern colors, whatever your interest is....this is how everyone (except the born artists amongst us) operate...NEVER become discouraged!! Keep on truckin' (as the Dead would say)...the more you paint - and subject your work to honest criticism, the better you will become - TIME - it is both our enemy and our friend - you can neither speed it up nor slow it down - will make you bettet. Ffind the medium that you are most comfortable with and stick to it until you master it - do NOT jump from medium to medium...I find that patining or roughing out the eyes in acrylics is easier FOR ME than painting them from scratch in the artist oils that I prefer to use for the rest of the figure...it takes time and effort to find your personal level of comfort...it took me years to find mine through experimentation, trial & error and utter frustration...frustration is the bane of all beginners, just don't give up...EVER!!! Trust me, you will NEVER be satisfied with your work, especially if you compare it with the Masters of the hobby...For years Brahms was frustrated as a young composer because he compared himself to Beethoven...eventually he overcame his frustration and is now among the Pantheon of great composers - it's the same with figure painters...ALL of us are hypercritical of our work...self criticism is good - to a point - WHEN IT BECOMES DESTRUCTIVE TO OUR CREATIVE ABILITY IT CAUSES US TO JUST CHUCK IT - if you don't utterly ENJOY the pasttime it becomes work and WORK Isn't fun. Figure International Magazine is a great source for painters who use acrylics as their medium of choice - find a few back issues and try to pick up some techniques contained in their pages...ands keep painting...if the hobby is causing depression, find another hobby...all of us who are 'into this hobby' do it because it's a source of relaxation, fun and personal accomplishment...I became hooked on it after I got out of the Army in 1974 (YES I'M THAT OLD!!!) I was frustrated because I couldn't get a realistic flesh tone for the 1/35th figures that came with the Tamiya armor kits - after a while I lost interest in Armor and began painting figures as a full time hobby - it became a 'passion'.

CB in FL



Chris, a truely valuable post here with much useful information over a wide range of information, beyond whether to buy cheap paint fom Micheal's. I especially concur with what you say about self-criticism.
Thanks for you your hard work.
You are quite an interesting writer. Please consider using the paragraph separation when writing long posts to clarify your thoughts.
thanks again
-JC in MA
majjanelson
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Posted: Thursday, July 19, 2012 - 02:25 AM UTC
You might want to get a copy of of the FEB12 issue of FineScale Modeler. On page 22 it has an article titled "Working with craft acrylics", by Joseph Marranca, which talks about how to use paints like Apple Barrel, including what to add to them to make them usable in AB applications.
montythefirst
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England - South West, United Kingdom
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Posted: Thursday, July 19, 2012 - 03:45 AM UTC

Quoted Text

You find that Vallejo dries up too quickly in the bottle?

I have some bottles of Vallejo that are going on 10 years old and are just as viscus today as they were when I bought them. Yes sometimes the dropper top gets gunked up with paint (especially black), but they can be taken off and cleaned, but have never had it dry in the bottle on me.



totally agree i have had most of mine about 9 years now with out any problems, yeah some bung up issues but that is easily sorted and when they separate out i just use a converted coffee frother to stir them, maybe Jody your storing them in a really warm place?