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RailRoad Modeling
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Marklin Gauge 1 ex-DR locomotives
velotrain
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Massachusetts, United States
Joined: December 23, 2010
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Posted: Friday, March 01, 2013 - 10:19 PM UTC
I received my two engines today, although the DR 80 came from Texas and the V36 is aus Deutschland. There are 1:48 and 1:24 figures with them; all my 1:35 figures are in pieces.



Here is the V36 with the hood casting from the Trumpeter kit (WR 360 C12) on top of it. The difference looks like more than the 9% it theoretically is.



My original intent was to build the kit around the Marklin chassis, but that clearly won’t work. I could just use the Marklin engines on 45mm track and put Gauge 1 wheelsets under the Dragon and Trumpeter wagons, but I now accept that 1:32 and 1:35 are just too far apart in size to operate together. Based on that, my new thought is to actually create operational 1:35 SG track and rolling stock. The first will be the easier part. This is a sample turnout I got from the guy who is building them for me.



You can get them attached to ties, ready to install, but I didn’t want that for several reasons. This is held together with temporary spacing strips soldered on top of the rails (the one on the left detached from one rail). You’re meant to lay ties and spike down the rails using a gauge device to make sure it is correct, as this is not guaranteed as shipped.

If I laid the track for 1:32 scale, that would equate to 1575mm, 2 proto inches wider than even Russian broad gauge. In 1:35 scale, standard gauge works out to precisely 41mm. Due to the way the turnout is delivered, all I need to do to re-gauge is remove one of the screws from the throw-bar (“switch rod” on the annotated proto photo previously posted) and drill a new hole. Since no one makes a track gauge for this, I’ll have to make my own. The other track will be no problem to build with basswood ties (sleepers for Brits), rails and spikes. This is an earlier NG project that started with similar turnouts.



I won’t bother with tie plates, although they were standard in Germany at the time - as seen on all the molded track sections. I had the turnouts built with code 148 rail, which is extremely light for Gauge 1, but should be a bit more reasonable at 1:35. I already have some on hand, and I can also bend it by hand, unlike code 200/205. This is the next size up, where you need a non-cheap tool appropriately called a rail-bender, due to the greatly increased stiffness.

I can probably find some quality 1:32 wheelsets where I can push the wheels in on the axle. Sometimes the axle has a “shoulder”, where this wouldn’t work.

The power chassis for the engines will be the real problem. I’m not about to pay for custom chassis builds. One option might be locating O-scale chassis with appropriate driver size and spacing, and then using longer axles and spreading the cylinders. This would be a lot easier if these weren’t rod-connected engines, as I would feel capable of doing that myself. With a steam, or jackshaft engine like the V36, not only would everything need to be disassembled, but reassembly requires a fussy process known as quartering - again with special tools required.

I just thought of another possibility. I do have the Kof 1 body from Baluard which has a simple chassis, and like the jackshaft drive of the V36, but I’m not married to it, or strict adherence to prototype. I know a fellow in Australia who makes production-tailored chassis, so will see what he might be able to do – or recommend.
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
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Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
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Posted: Saturday, March 02, 2013 - 04:10 AM UTC
Charles,

This is an exciting project! The track work is great. What is the size of the diorama? Approx 3 X 5? Your interest in industrial switching shows.

Even though you wrote that no 1/35 figures were used in the photo of the lokies, I didn't make the connection and thought those engines look awfully small. Then I recalled this little NG Plymouth that I have crewed:

http://www.doerivergorge.com/railroad/plymouth.php
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 7,772 posts
Historicus Forma: 172 posts
Posted: Saturday, March 02, 2013 - 04:15 AM UTC
The V36, is it the same design Trump is modeling with the WR 360? I noticed the cowling between the prime mover access doors and the louvers is about 1/2 the width on the Trumpter kit. Did Trumpy get it wrong or did Marklin stretch their model for the electronics? I have no reference material for this.

Also, are you familiar with this O scale (German O - 1/45) BR 80? Rivarossi BR 80
velotrain
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Massachusetts, United States
Joined: December 23, 2010
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Posted: Saturday, March 02, 2013 - 04:50 AM UTC
Fred -

These are two separate projects. The board with the track down is 32mm gauge(O)for Fn2/Hn2. The ties are well spread because it's NG. That's going to be the Coughlin Coffin Company. Their motto is "40 years in business without a repeat sale".

As for their RR line, "We're a small, but deadly serious railway".

Fiddle yard is to the left front (from the photo view)and the office in that corner connects to the factory with an overhead walkway. The back door of the factory will be lumber in, but I might have a separate little warehouse along the back wall for hardware and other supplies. The finished coffins come out the middle track, probably getting loaded on the cars I just took the lumber off of.

I'll have access from the right side, likely with the tracks continuing through the wall onto a traverser, so I can do a John Allen Loads in, empties out for the lumber in the fiddle area, and just the opposite for the finished product. It's such a small space, that I designed it with all trailing point turnouts to make switching easier, without needing a runaround track.

The engineshed will go in the hole on the front right side. An outside engine brings in the loads from the interchange, and leaves them on the track by/under the office. A shop switcher does the work, then leaves the outbound cars for pickup. At one point I wanted a powerhouse with an animated coal drop and conveyor, but decided that I just didn't have the space. One of many unfinished projects. I think I was just starting to install the Tortoises and the control wiring. I was also toying with recording sounds of guys unloading wood, sawing, and then hammering.

I have mixed feelings about sound and light, partly thinking that your imagination should supply them.

Charles



I've actually been thinking that I should get some of the 1:35 wagon kits completed and see just how bad they look behind the engines before I do anything radical. However, I'm concerned that the wheels will be too far out in relation to the body
velotrain
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Massachusetts, United States
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Posted: Saturday, March 02, 2013 - 05:19 AM UTC
I've looked at it in the past, but forget the details. I think it was something like only 2 of the 12's were produced, but then a dozen or so of the 14's were made - either late war, or just after. There were definite changes in the side panels, and that bump on the forehead wasn't on the earlier version.

If it's too difficult/expensive to power the kit with a jackshaft drive, I may just use 0-6-0 with slightly wider spacing of the axles. I think many, most of the early engines used the jackshaft, until they considered having the prime mover run a generator and power traction motors at each axle.

Thanks, I'll take a look at that O-scale version, but stretching a steam chassis sideways is not a frivolous task. I've used donor chassis for scratched / bashed superstructures, mostly using N-scale engines to make HOn30 critters, but have never really messed with a drive system. I know another guy in CT who makes beautiful, precision chassis for HOn30 with equalization at one end, and maybe I could get him to form a frame for a converted O-scale chassis. There just isn't enough open axle to narrow the wheels on the Marklin engines.

Charles