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RailRoad Modeling
For general topics on RailRoad modeling.
RDA Branch Line Engine House
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 7,772 posts
Historicus Forma: 172 posts
Posted: Thursday, March 14, 2013 - 04:22 PM UTC
I am building RDA's Branch Line Engine House, as reviewed here: http://railroadmodeling.kitmaker.net/modules.php?op=modload&name=Reviews&file=index&req=showcontent&id=8827

The kit is modular and comprised of 12 uniform wall sections. They are joined by external pilasters of 3 sizes; the widest ones are used in this kit to raise the height of the walls.

I aligned and secured the sections in my magnetic gluing jig. The parts are joined with different types of BSI superglues. Even though I did not wash the plastic to remove mold oil, finger prints, or debris from sanding, none of the BSI lost its grip and failed.




To extend and reinforce the gluing face for the corners RDA molds corner "L" parts that look like half-dog bones. In the following photo it is the component on the right edge of the wall section.

JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 7,772 posts
Historicus Forma: 172 posts
Posted: Saturday, March 16, 2013 - 07:25 AM UTC
This model fits together well. It is molded for modular construction.

Squaring up the wall sections, I used this corner "L" brace to keep the walls a uniform distance from my jig.


Here I am using the thick styrene sheet provided in the kit to square the corners.

This is the configuration I am creating.

These wall parts bowed slightly and I used a beam made from the sheets to reinforce them.
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 7,772 posts
Historicus Forma: 172 posts
Posted: Sunday, March 17, 2013 - 05:30 AM UTC
Squaring up the wall sections before painting and joining them:



RDA includes thick sheet plastic for the roof, floor, making supports and other purposes. The sheets are about 1/8-inch thick. At first I shuddered and thought, Oh no, these will take forever to cut. Then I recalled that styrene, when scribed, snaps apart. A few passes with a knife or razor saw scribes a groove about a quarter-sheet deep; a little pressure and SNAP, a clean edge. This sheet plastic can be used to strengthen the wall as we have seen. RDA suggests making internal beams and supports to span the engine bay and this sheet will work. While most of the wall sections stay fairly straight, the sections with the door and window and engine portal, when paired, bowed a bit. That is why I used a piece of plastic to reinforce them, as seen above. Another use I suggest is cutting equilateral triangles to square the corners.

If you fit the office extension, the instructions tell us that the wall section that joins the engine house wall will need trimming. Careful alignment and squaring the corners are necessary to make this cut properly.



I cut the wall part. To make sure the corner is as sturdy as possible, I used the last corner "L" to create a slot and groove for it.



I freelanced from the plans a bit to customize my building: one side of the building has raised walls. As a result the office backing is raised, too. To help the extension span the gap I supported it with a length of the thick styrene sheet.



To keep the sheet from warpin inward I used a discarded overflow tab to make hold the support straight with the rest of the wall.



Yes, I have to march to my own drum, and decided to peak the roof over the office. I measured, cut, and trimmed two pieces of sheet for the roof.





Here's how it looks right now. Next step, the main roof.

JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 7,772 posts
Historicus Forma: 172 posts
Posted: Sunday, March 17, 2013 - 08:07 AM UTC
Big decision: Jackson Purchase & Texas spans the country from the limestone of Kentucky through the granite of the Rockies, across Arizona pink sandstones, and over Californian quartz. So in what geological area do I locate this engine house and thus paint the rock?
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 7,772 posts
Historicus Forma: 172 posts
Posted: Wednesday, April 17, 2013 - 03:51 AM UTC
Sequestration has impacted the contractor of the engine house! No fear, the brass hat has donned a tool belt and construction has resumed!

Unfortunately, the photo archivist forgot how to use his camera and deleted several photos worthy of Musée du Louvre: brush staining wooden parts and hacking away on plastic parts. So what have we now? No prob.

The main roof has been weatherproofed with tar paper. I made the paper with dollar-store masking tape. I tore off short strips and stuck them on the lower lip of the roof, then added successive strips towards the high end. Each new piece has a slight overlap onto the previous one. When each row is down, I start the entire process alongside it, slightly overlapping the edge of the proceeding row. The result looks like tar paper rolled with moderate care. A coat of cheap flat black dollar store spray paint seals the tape. It also makes some ends peeled up a skosh. No prob, CA tacs it down. The result you can judge for yourself. I think it looks like aging tar paper roof; graying it down with grays will make it look more weather-beaten.


I applied the same technique to the peaked roof of the office.


While no stall doors were included in the kit, RDA sent me these great laser-cut wooden doors:


Staining and painting of those and other doors and windows are the lost photos. Also lost are the cutting and fitting of the clerestory cut to perch atop the office:


This is the building awaiting windows, doors, and roof details:


Check back soon!
windysean
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Wisconsin, United States
Joined: September 11, 2009
KitMaker: 1,917 posts
Historicus Forma: 25 posts
Posted: Wednesday, April 17, 2013 - 04:53 AM UTC
I just found this thread. Nicely done, Fred! I'll be watching from here on out (assuming you don't lose any more photos. )
-Sean
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 7,772 posts
Historicus Forma: 172 posts
Posted: Sunday, April 21, 2013 - 10:12 AM UTC
I really appreciate stone buildings. I want to model them yet have been intimidated by replicating authentic stone colors. Stone buildings are usually constructed with local stone and will look like the local cliffs. While I am not a geologist, I have noticed some exposed rock faces with very different strata colors, plus sometimes rail facilities preceded industries and thus building materials had to be imported from elsewhere. Sometimes different stone was used for artistic architectural effects. Thus, I have seen stone buildings with facades not uniform in rock coloration. That is what I decided to replicate here.





To achieve this facade I started by painting the exterior with common inexpensive light gray-tan rattle-can paint. Then I followed up with painting individual stones with inexpensive acrylic hobby store paint. Colors used are terracotta, mocha, camel, sage, and some off-white.

The thought of painting each, or almost each, stone individually was daunting. I tried different techniques: spot-painting a few blocks; area painting with a broad brush; drybrushing.

None were quite right so I bit the bullet and began working with a No.4 flat brush. Insane, right? Surprisingly, no, actually. I finished this work in about 3 hours of casual dabbing while listening to music and following TV shows. It really went by quickly.

Consider that when I admit there are two layers on each wall. Most blocks were painted out of the bottle, yet some are diluted washes. Paints were squirted out onto the prior color on the pallet - mixing together is not a worry. After the first layer dried, I would add more straight, diluted, and mixed colors on stones to suit my artistic eye. Then I stippled on certain colors drybrush-style at the end of a cheap stiff bristle brush. A few areas received a airbrushing of a contrasting color. Then I followed up painting a few more individual rocks.

To keep myself from unconsciously painting the same patterns on each wall section, I would paint one, then turn the wall upside-down, or stand it on its side. Artistically, some areas and sections look to my artistic eye to be a bit off in color harmony; I purposely forced myself to not 'pretty' it up so as to look like a utility structure instead of an architectural masterpiece.

Yup, only a few hours of work and it went pretty fast. I have shot it with a clear flat and next will wash it down with a mix to simulate mortar.
TUGA
#034
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Setubal, Portugal
Joined: April 26, 2002
KitMaker: 1,718 posts
Historicus Forma: 41 posts
Posted: Monday, April 22, 2013 - 06:47 AM UTC
Hi,


Looking good

JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 7,772 posts
Historicus Forma: 172 posts
Posted: Wednesday, April 24, 2013 - 06:32 PM UTC
An inspiration: the civic center in Clarksdale, AZ:
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 7,772 posts
Historicus Forma: 172 posts
Posted: Wednesday, May 08, 2013 - 01:18 PM UTC
Welcome to my open (engine) house!



JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 7,772 posts
Historicus Forma: 172 posts
Posted: Thursday, May 09, 2013 - 12:30 PM UTC
This build log has been converted into a feature:

Branch Engine House

Stop by and visit!
ChristopherBlackwell
_VISITCOMMUNITY
New Mexico, United States
Joined: August 18, 2013
KitMaker: 1 posts
Historicus Forma: 0 posts
Posted: Sunday, August 18, 2013 - 09:06 AM UTC
Now that is what I call a tight fit. I am glad that I work with smaller locomotives.

Now it would appear that one could modify that engine house just by choosing the number of wall panels used. I could see making it narrower and perhaps a bit shorter for my smaller locomotive.
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 7,772 posts
Historicus Forma: 172 posts
Posted: Monday, March 17, 2014 - 12:53 PM UTC
This engine may soon have a foundation to help with vertical clearance.