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Painting
Discuss all areas of historical miniature painting and painting preparation.
Technique crossover question
mawelch74
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United States
Joined: September 29, 2014
KitMaker: 12 posts
Historicus Forma: 10 posts
Posted: Thursday, October 02, 2014 - 12:58 PM UTC
I purchased a very nice book about painting ancient and medieval miniatures. Little did I know, it is wholly in regard to painting with oils. My intention from the outset has been to use acrylics, so my question is, will some oil techniques work with acrylics? I'm sure some blending techniques are right out the window due to the drying time of acrylics, but in general, how much do the two mediums have in common?

I have artist's oils in my collection of art supplies, so they are a readily available option, however I'm not certain I have the patience to work with them due to the drying time and size of the miniatures I'll be working on. Though I might find them of use should I move up in size as I progress.
PeeDee
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England - North West, United Kingdom
Joined: September 03, 2011
KitMaker: 608 posts
Historicus Forma: 98 posts
Posted: Friday, October 03, 2014 - 09:38 AM UTC
It's an age old question you ask my friend.
Here's my take on it.
Today's figure modellers are indoctrinated into a process of
1) Spray primer to seal the figure
2) Undercoat in Acrylics or enmels two thin coats
3) Paint and blend highlights and shadows with a superfine superthin oil topcoat.

I don't.

Undercoat your model by all means

Paint acrylic base coat or perhaps two thin coats
While you've got your acrylics out, finish it !

If your paint is thinned properly, you can paint the basecoat the proper colour, say red, you can paint the highlights and shadows by mixing other colours. And ONCE dry, add thin washes or glazes back over to give the transitions get the grades and ashades you started out to achieve.
Many people think I paint in oils,because they say I get a softer blending than they do.
This pleases me more than being praised. It's what I've been wanting to achieve.
I have painted in Acrylic since the age of 15 and glazing is second nature to me. I just paint in layers of thin paint and it builds up quickly.
I only use acrylics now and even have a hair dryer to speed the drying to get to the next layer !
Have a look at my gallery there's stuff there in all scales, and have fun.
Some folk, me included win competitions regularly, against figs painted in oils. So these days do what makes you happy.
Paul
PeeDee
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England - North West, United Kingdom
Joined: September 03, 2011
KitMaker: 608 posts
Historicus Forma: 98 posts
Posted: Saturday, October 04, 2014 - 05:00 AM UTC
Matt I just re-read my post to you and realised I had overlooked something.
I too have a full set of oil paints, and also a set of alkyd paints. Don't waste your oils paints though.
By all means paint your figures in acrylics, but if you create groundwork the oils will work well in painting the base by staining any porous materials, thinned down they work superbly well when adding age or weathering to any metals or buildings.
Have fun and experiment on any spare bits and bobs you have to hand.
Paul
mawelch74
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United States
Joined: September 29, 2014
KitMaker: 12 posts
Historicus Forma: 10 posts
Posted: Monday, October 06, 2014 - 03:04 AM UTC
Thanks for the replies. Pretty much everything I've been seeing is based on painting with acrylics, so that's the direction I'm going to be heading, just happened to buy this book and feel like it was a wasted expense. Such is life.

Now I need to determine which acrylics I want to use, just another age-old topic from what I'm gathering.