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Tamiya Ultra thin Adhesive
flatfour
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Posted: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 - 11:56 PM UTC
I have just purchased my first Rye Fields Models kit and during my research prior to purchase, I came across a video review that said that Rye Fields Kits don't give very good results when using Tamiya Ultra thin Adhesive, I am a returning modeller and absolutely love the product, it's so much better than products I grew up with. Has anybody had any bad experience of using the Tamiya adhesive with Rye Fields Kits? Watto.
Tojo72
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Posted: Thursday, September 17, 2020 - 01:03 AM UTC
I have used Tamiya Extra Thin,I assume you mean the liquid in the bottle with the green cap, with many companies styrene,Tamiya,Dragon,Hasegawa Trumpeter,Meng with good success.I have one RFM kit in the stash and its plastic looks the same as any others nor have I read anyone's comments that it requires one company's glue or anothers.I think Tamiya Extra Thin will be fine.

Just rechecked,I couldn't find a product named Tamiya Ultra Thin Adhesive,are you sure thats it.
flatfour
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Posted: Thursday, September 17, 2020 - 01:20 AM UTC
Hi Anthony, I may have got the name wrong but, yes its the one with the green top. Thanks got getting back to me so quickly. I'm looking forward to getting 'stuck in' All the best Watto.
barkingdigger
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ARMORAMA
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Posted: Thursday, September 17, 2020 - 03:36 AM UTC
Not sure about the "problem", but I built my RFM M4A3E8 with Tamiya glue with no problems. Bear in mind there are two flavours of X-thin - the one with the medium-green cap is a normal liquid cement giving a few seconds of drying time but the one with the light green cap is fast-acting and evaporates almost instantly, so it is best used by holding the parts together and letting it wick into the joint. (You can't coat the part with this glue before offering it up because in that moment before it makes contact the X-thin will evaporate!)
Scarred
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Posted: Thursday, September 17, 2020 - 04:01 AM UTC
Test it yourself. Cut a few pieces of sprue for the RFM kit, make some clean, even cut ends and glue the pieces of sprue together end to end.

Look at the results, if it looks good and makes a solid join then the glue is ok.
Kevlar06
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Posted: Thursday, September 17, 2020 - 05:57 AM UTC

Quoted Text

...Rye Fields Kits don't give very good results when using Tamiya Ultra thin Adhesive, I am a returning modeller and absolutely love the product, it's so much better than products I grew up with. Has anybody had any bad experience of using the Tamiya adhesive with Rye Fields Kits? Watto.



Ok, just to be clear, there is no such glue as “Tamiya Ultra Thin”. There is “Tamiya Extra Thin”, and “Tamiya Extra Thin, Quick Setting” which is a bit less common. The “Quick Setting“ has a lighter green cap than plain Extra Thin, and the words “Quick Setting” in smaller print on the lower center of the label. I’ve tried both on RFM kits, and had no problems with either. As someone else mentioned, the “Quick Setting” tends to evaporate quickly, and is better intended to glue small parts which are best fitted together before gluing, allowing the cement to “wick” into seams without damage. Therefore, if you’re gluing large parts like fuselage or hull halves together, “Tamiya Extra Thin Quick Setting“ is really not suitable for any model manufacturers plastic. RFM uses the same old styrene pellets other manufacturers use when making their kits, so you shouldn’t have a problem using both Tamiya Cements, depending on what you’re trying to do with it. Here’s a link to the “Extra Thin Quick Setting”, which explains the difference between the two types:

https://www.tamiyausa.com/shop/finishing/extra-thin-cement/

Personally, I prefer the plain old “Extra Thin”, and have never had a problem with it for any application.
VR, Russ
Vicious
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Posted: Thursday, September 17, 2020 - 09:37 AM UTC
The classic green cap is mi go to glue i tried the quick setting but i find the good old MEK is faster, cheaper and works better...my 2 cents
flatfour
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Posted: Thursday, September 17, 2020 - 09:03 PM UTC
Cheers Tom, I'm learning stuff all the time, thanks for the feedback.
flatfour
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Posted: Friday, September 18, 2020 - 08:29 PM UTC
Cheers Russ,your comments have clarified the differences between the two products. The Rye field kit is next up and the comments in the review I read had made me seek advice from people who would know,that's why I asked here. Thanks again. Watto
Kevlar06
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Posted: Saturday, September 19, 2020 - 07:10 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Cheers Russ,your comments have clarified the differences between the two products. The Rye field kit is next up and the comments in the review I read had made me seek advice from people who would know,that's why I asked here. Thanks again. Watto



This is the right place to come for questions, so you’re “on target” there. You’ll find the folks here are a pretty helpful bunch for the most part. While we’re on the subject of glues, I’ve found the “limonene” based glues to be less “adhesive” and more particular about sticking to certain plastics. But there are manufacturers who have made kits out of “alternative plastic” such as ABS, or Acetate based plastics, and no styrene glue will work on those. I have in mind the old Borax 20 Mule team kits of the 50s and 60s (which probably never made it to your neck of the woods). But there are others, like the early “Pegasus” kits of the 1/18 scale V-1 upon which no glue except cyanoacrylate worked. So yes, there are “glue resistant“ kits out there. RFM isn’t one. By the way, no styrene glues work on resin— for those kits and figures , you’ll need cyanoacrylates or epoxies. And I have an old Track-Link 1/32 metal kit of the FT-17, self explanatory I guess, but the only glue I’ve found that works for heavy parts in that kit is epoxy.
VR, Russ
flatfour
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Posted: Saturday, September 19, 2020 - 09:22 PM UTC
Fantastic Russ, thanks for the information. Watto.
Scarred
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Posted: Sunday, September 20, 2020 - 04:29 AM UTC
I actually have one of those 20 mule team kits. With the original instructions. Wonder if it's worth anything. One other thing you might run across is vinyl and not the flexible type used in rubber band style tracks. A certain company made sci-fi kits out of vinyl. I have a NOSTROMO from Alien made from the stuff. I've tested different glues on pieces of the flash and haven't found anything that gives a secure bond. Even newer types of epoxy don't work. Sometimes I wonder what the heck model manufactures were thinking.
Kevlar06
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Posted: Sunday, September 20, 2020 - 04:41 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I actually have one of those 20 mule team kits. With the original instructions. Wonder if it's worth anything. One other thing you might run across is vinyl and not the flexible type used in rubber band style tracks. A certain company made sci-fi kits out of vinyl. I have a NOSTROMO from Alien made from the stuff. I've tested different glues on pieces of the flash and haven't found anything that gives a secure bond. Even newer types of epoxy don't work. Sometimes I wonder what the heck model manufactures were thinking.



You might try JB weld epoxy on the NOSTROMO, I’ve had success with it on SOME vinyl products. As for the 20 Mule Team model, I’ve occasionally seen one or two for sale at the Seattle IPMS annual shows over the years. They usually don’t go for much—$15-20 but I think you’d have better luck on EBay, especially if complete and in the box. Last one I saw at the show was in a box. Most modelers are painfully aware the plastic is difficult to glue. But as an antique, it will likely go for more. My Dad and I built one in the early 60s. We used a sticky, amber colored paper glue that came in a brown fluted bottle with an angled red rubber applicator, I can’t remember the brand, and don’t think it’s made anymore. Dad popped the rubber applicator off, and used a brush to dab on the glue. It actually worked for a while to hold the parts together, it must have been an acetate based glue. But after about five years, parts started to fall off. Of course, this was before cyanoacrylates, which would likely work today.
VR, Russ
Grauwolf
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Posted: Sunday, September 20, 2020 - 04:56 AM UTC

Quoted Text

We used a sticky, amber colored paper glue that came in a brown fluted bottle with an angled red rubber applicator, I can’t remember the brand



That was likely LEPAGE MUCILAGE glue.

Cheers,
Kevlar06
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Posted: Sunday, September 20, 2020 - 05:42 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

We used a sticky, amber colored paper glue that came in a brown fluted bottle with an angled red rubber applicator, I can’t remember the brand



That was likely LEPAGE MUCILAGE glue.

Cheers,



Could be, I really can’t remember now, we’re talking about 1960 or 61 I think. A lot of liquid cement “has gone under the bridge” since then! I do remember Lepage’s school glues though. Dad also had a very sticky glue that came in a metal tin with a brush cap. I remember building some Aurora ship model in 1959 on my own. I snuck into Dad’s garage workshop and “borrowed” that glue to build the ship model in about an hour. As Dad was a Navy Vet, he just said “nice job, doesn’t quite look like what I remember though”. I think the glue I used was sealing glue for rubber to metal contact on automotive water pumps. But it worked! I had that model for several years, and remember it even floated in the swimming pool without losing parts. That is, until it met the fire cracker depth charge. I apologize for being off topic. But I’m sure my adventures with “modeling glues” are not unique. I’ve improved a lot since those days.
VR, Russ
flatfour
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Posted: Sunday, September 20, 2020 - 11:53 PM UTC
When I was a kid, my Dad got a product that came in two separate tins, he mixed them and after about an hour had something that resembled a piece of hard rubber about 1 cm thick, he cut out a piece and used it to repair my school shoes. All was OK until I stood on the terraces at my local football ground, after about 20 minutes into the game, two or three of the people around me began to comment about a black sticky mass that was attaching it's self to their shoes and trousers, turns out that the two part rubber had reverted back to its two parts as I was jostled around the packed terrace! When I got home there was absolutely no sign of the repair on my shoe.... I know this is off topic but, it's made me smile and I thought I should share.
Scarred
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Posted: Monday, September 21, 2020 - 12:52 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

I actually have one of those 20 mule team kits. With the original instructions. Wonder if it's worth anything. One other thing you might run across is vinyl and not the flexible type used in rubber band style tracks. A certain company made sci-fi kits out of vinyl. I have a NOSTROMO from Alien made from the stuff. I've tested different glues on pieces of the flash and haven't found anything that gives a secure bond. Even newer types of epoxy don't work. Sometimes I wonder what the heck model manufactures were thinking.



You might try JB weld epoxy on the NOSTROMO, I’ve had success with it on SOME vinyl products. As for the 20 Mule Team model, I’ve occasionally seen one or two for sale at the Seattle IPMS annual shows over the years. They usually don’t go for much—$15-20 but I think you’d have better luck on EBay, especially if complete and in the box. Last one I saw at the show was in a box. Most modelers are painfully aware the plastic is difficult to glue. But as an antique, it will likely go for more. My Dad and I built one in the early 60s. We used a sticky, amber colored paper glue that came in a brown fluted bottle with an angled red rubber applicator, I can’t remember the brand, and don’t think it’s made anymore. Dad popped the rubber applicator off, and used a brush to dab on the glue. It actually worked for a while to hold the parts together, it must have been an acetate based glue. But after about five years, parts started to fall off. Of course, this was before cyanoacrylates, which would likely work today.
VR, Russ



I tried GorillaWeld epoxy and it didn't hold. I'll get some JB Weld next time I head to town. I never could understand the use of vinyl for models. The large pieces, the various hulls and sponsons have concave surfaces. I'm been thinking of ways to make them flat and the best way I can think of will include sheets of brass cut to fit the insides of the pieces and then using struts to push them apart to level the surfaces and filling the remaining space with expanding foam so they don't revert back to concave. However that stuff produces some heat so I'm danged if I do, danged if I don't.
Kevlar06
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Posted: Monday, September 21, 2020 - 05:06 AM UTC

Quoted Text

When I was a kid, my Dad got a product that came in two separate tins, he mixed them and after about an hour had something that resembled a piece of hard rubber about 1 cm thick, he cut out a piece and used it to repair my school shoes. All was OK until I stood on the terraces at my local football ground, after about 20 minutes into the game, two or three of the people around me began to comment about a black sticky mass that was attaching it's self to their shoes and trousers, turns out that the two part rubber had reverted back to its two parts as I was jostled around the packed terrace! When I got home there was absolutely no sign of the repair on my shoe.... I know this is off topic but, it's made me smile and I thought I should share.



We’re talking about adhesives, so I don’t think your comment is really off topic, especially since you’re the original poster, and if you’re satisfied with the answer about RFM kits and Tamiya glues. But that’s a funny story about your shoes. Did anyone have a clue you were the culprit?

Regarding rubber and adhesives, I used to work in a LHS. We started carrying the Bob Smith Industries cyanoacrylate brand about 2008, and they’d send us samples to try. When they came out with a “flexible” cyanoacrylate for bonding rubber, I kind of dismissed the idea as a marketing ploy. My boss did too, but told me to take a bottle home and see if it would be useful. The bottle sat on my workbench for about a year. One day, I was driving my SUV down the road and swerved to miss a dog that unexpectedly ran in front of me, striking the curb with my right front tire. When I got home, I found a three inch strip of rubber had been peeled off the sidewall, and was hanging by a thread, exposing the cord (in the US, that would be a new tire). Just then, I remembered the “rubber” cyanoacrylate glue, and glued the strip in. I drove on that tire for six years, with no problems until I had to replace the set! After periodically checking the tire, and pleased with the repair, I also used the glue to repair a crack in the leather drivers seat in 2012, and it’s still holding today, 8 years later. I’m now sold on the “flexible” super glues, they really do work on rubber, vinyl and other flexible materials. However, they’re not as good on slippery plastic.
VR, Russ
Kevlar06
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Posted: Monday, September 21, 2020 - 05:13 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text


Quoted Text

I actually have one of those 20 mule team kits. With the original instructions. Wonder if it's worth anything. One other thing you might run across is vinyl and not the flexible type used in rubber band style tracks. A certain company made sci-fi kits out of vinyl. I have a NOSTROMO from Alien made from the stuff. I've tested different glues on pieces of the flash and haven't found anything that gives a secure bond. Even newer types of epoxy don't work. Sometimes I wonder what the heck model manufactures were thinking.



You might try JB weld epoxy on the NOSTROMO, I’ve had success with it on SOME vinyl products. As for the 20 Mule Team model, I’ve occasionally seen one or two for sale at the Seattle IPMS annual shows over the years. They usually don’t go for much—$15-20 but I think you’d have better luck on EBay, especially if complete and in the box. Last one I saw at the show was in a box. Most modelers are painfully aware the plastic is difficult to glue. But as an antique, it will likely go for more. My Dad and I built one in the early 60s. We used a sticky, amber colored paper glue that came in a brown fluted bottle with an angled red rubber applicator, I can’t remember the brand, and don’t think it’s made anymore. Dad popped the rubber applicator off, and used a brush to dab on the glue. It actually worked for a while to hold the parts together, it must have been an acetate based glue. But after about five years, parts started to fall off. Of course, this was before cyanoacrylates, which would likely work today.
VR, Russ



I tried GorillaWeld epoxy and it didn't hold. I'll get some JB Weld next time I head to town. I never could understand the use of vinyl for models. The large pieces, the various hulls and sponsons have concave surfaces. I'm been thinking of ways to make them flat and the best way I can think of will include sheets of brass cut to fit the insides of the pieces and then using struts to push them apart to level the surfaces and filling the remaining space with expanding foam so they don't revert back to concave. However that stuff produces some heat so I'm danged if I do, danged if I don't.



Besides JB Weld, you might also try the Bob Smith Industries “Flexible” glue I mentioned above, and I’ve been reading about the new UV activated glue that’s been recently on the market—it looks promising too.
VR, Russ
Scarred
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Posted: Monday, September 21, 2020 - 07:12 AM UTC
UV activated glue. And that stuff is strong. It's what the Army used to repair my teeth after they were chipped when I ate a racquetball racket in 85. The were testing its strength and durability so they capped my teeth and checked them a couple times a year until 92. By then the study was over, they recapped them with UV glue and the are still holding today. I'm gonna order some this week. Thanks for the idea.
TopSmith
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Posted: Saturday, October 03, 2020 - 05:46 AM UTC
For that old impossible to glue vinyl stuff try "shoe goo" it is stringy to work with but it is made to work with rubbery stuff. I have used it on tennis shoe soles to repair a loose sole, glued slot car bodies together with it, attached loose window molding on the wifes car etc.
Kevlar06
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Posted: Saturday, October 03, 2020 - 06:44 AM UTC
Since we’re kind of “resurrecting” this thread from a couple of weeks ago, I’d like to share with you something one of the members of our local modeling group has discovered— it turns out Tamiya “Airbrush Cleaner” (comes in the oversized plastic jar with the red cap) is the same formulation as the Tamiya “extra thin quick setting” cement. This means you can get about eight times as much cement if you buy their “airbrush cleaner” and use it as cement than you can can if you buy the smaller bottle of ETQS. For around here, a bottle of extra thin QS goes for about $4.99, whereas a large bottle of Airbrush Thinner is about $10. That’s a huge savings.
VR, Russ