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Painting: Painting with Oils
Discuss Oil painting techniques.
Shading red paint
mongo_mel
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Pennsylvania, United States
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Posted: Thursday, October 24, 2002 - 04:32 AM UTC
I've always used a brown to shade red whenever I paint a figure. I was recently told that you should never use brown, and that blue was the right color to use.
Anybody out there have an opinion on this that they would be willing to share?
Thanks,
slodder
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North Carolina, United States
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Posted: Thursday, October 24, 2002 - 04:55 AM UTC
In conversations about painting with my sister - BA in Fine Arts - she has mentioned that blue does shade red in a 'Color Wheel' perfect world. She's recommended purple as a shade color too, dark, rich, and not void of color.

As I'm sure you've seen in posts all over here. Do what looks good and do what pleases you.
yellobelli
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Posted: Thursday, October 24, 2002 - 05:13 AM UTC
I've always just "cheated". Unlike other colors, I tend to do my reds in a different order. I usually paint the base color, shade using inks/washes and some amount of blending down, followed by drybrushing or blending highlights up.

With reds, I start with a darker shade of red, add the base color over the top of it, followed by highlighting with a lighter shade of red. I "cheat" in that I don't mix, I've mostly used pre-mixed shades of red that complement each other.

Another trick that I'm using now is to base coat in a flat black. I then use a bright red (in this case Games Workshop's Blood Angel Red) and paint a thin coat. Over the black, this first coat will be a deep red/magenta/dried blood color. I then paint successive coats, each one adding a little more color depth. It takes a lot longer (I've got about 15 coats on the model so far), but gives me a good blend of shading/highlighting.

Like I said...I cheat a little bit. Then again, you'd be amazed at what I have to go through in order to get models I like. I'm red/green color deficient (I know...I know. What the heck am I doing trying to paint if I'm color blind?!) so I have to cut corners where I can as I can't keep asking my girlfriend if the color I've mixed is "right."

You can go back to ignoring me now.
whisky12
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Posted: Thursday, October 24, 2002 - 05:26 AM UTC
Craig,
As a basic rule, I use the color wheel as my litmus test for shading and highlighting...on the color wheel, if you look at the color red, to the right is a purple and to the left an orange...at the deepest point of your shadow, adding a alzarian crimson to the base red gives you a deep purple for the shading...adding a touch of cadium yellow to the base red gives you the orange for highlighting...
I recommend using the wet on wet technique and applying the shading color to the red on the figure and then blending it at the edges with a dry brush...then working out to the highlights, apply the orange for highlights and blend...for an example, take a look at the KGL Officer on my page, and you can see how I work my reds...
Hope this helps...

Patrick
BobTavis
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Posted: Thursday, October 24, 2002 - 05:40 AM UTC
Mongo, you should read the article on this web site from Einion Rees about painting with Complementary Colors. It is a valid technique that is well known in the fine art world. The article is very well written and offers some good answers to shading any color.
mongo_mel
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Pennsylvania, United States
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Posted: Thursday, October 24, 2002 - 06:05 AM UTC
Hi Guys,
Thanks for all the quick responses!
I've never heard of using a purple to shade red...sounds interesting. When I stop to think about it, red and blue mix to make purple, so...

I also use the cheaters method when I paint reds. I paint an undercoat of red acrylic. Then I paint my base oil using whatever red I think is appropriate. When that's dry, I do my shadows. Once I did a trick where I painted the entire surface with the brown shadow color and then wiped it off, leaving a stain of brown. It actually looked pretty good!
Then, when dry, the highlights with Cad. Red Light (looks fairly orange).

Patrick, I've seen your KGL Officer before and I think it's great!

OK....for the next red I do, I'm going to try what you guys have suggested. Unfortunately, the figs on my work bench are a Batman bust and a Rocky Mountain Fur Trapper....not much red there!

Thanks again for the help,
whisky12
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Posted: Thursday, October 24, 2002 - 06:14 AM UTC
Craig,
Glad to help...exchanges like this is what makes this site so invaluable...
All the best...

Patrick
AJLaFleche
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Massachusetts, United States
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Posted: Thursday, October 24, 2002 - 07:59 AM UTC
I also like Alizarin Crimson for red shadows and I use yellow mixed with red for highlights. Now if I could only that darn Donovan song out of my head every I use it. #:-)
BobTavis
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Posted: Thursday, October 24, 2002 - 08:46 AM UTC
"Now if I could only that darn Donovan song out of my head every I use it."

Not Mellow Yellow I am sure.
sgtreef
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Oklahoma, United States
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Posted: Thursday, October 24, 2002 - 11:42 PM UTC
Good article in Military Modeler mag on this a couple of months back (:-)
AJLaFleche
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Posted: Friday, October 25, 2002 - 12:34 AM UTC

Quoted Text

"Now if I could only that darn Donovan song out of my head every I use it."

Not Mellow Yellow I am sure.



Nope, "Wear Your Love Like Heaven" wherein he used a number of oil colors such as Prussian Blue, Alizarin Crimson and Rose Carmethine, though the site I confirmed the title refers to "Color sky brush and blue...Alissari and crimson ."
#:-)