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RailRoad Modeling
For general topics on RailRoad modeling.
Standard, Narrow and Broad Gauge
AlanL
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England - East Anglia, United Kingdom
Joined: August 12, 2005
KitMaker: 14,499 posts
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Posted: Friday, August 04, 2006 - 12:26 AM UTC
Greetings all,

Here's a link that will help clarify the rail width question at least as far as British Track is concerned.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rail_gauge#Britain

Now you wizards - what's 4ft 8+1/2ins in 1/35??????

Cheers

Al

Some more info:

During the World War II, the Southern found itself at the front line. Before hostilities, 75% of SR traffic was passenger with just 25% being freight; during the War, roughly the same number of passengers was carried but it only made up 40% of total traffic - freight traffic had grown to such an extent that it made up 60% of total traffic. A desperate shortage of freight locomotives was remedied by Chief Engineer Oliver Bulleid who designed a remarkable 0-6-0 locomotive, the SR Class Q1, which was the most powerful such engine ever to operate in Britain. Forty of these machines transformed the Southern's ability to haul heavy freight and, in retrospect, the sheer volume of military freight and Allied soldiers moved by this primarily commuter railway was a breathtaking feat.

and some more:

Overview
In late 1939 the Southern Railway, until then primarily a high-density commuter railway serving London and South-East England, suddenly found itself on the British frontlines of the Second World War.

The railway became an essential strategic war asset, and desperately needed to equip itself to handle freight in the vast quantities required for the defending forces, and later (as 'D-Day' approached) for the invading armies, as well as very large volumes of troop movements. The railway's innovative Chief Mechanical Engineer, Oliver Bulleid, designed the Q1. Anything larger than a six-coupled design (such as a 2-8-0) would have presented problems in terms of axle loadings, so an 0-6-0 design was chosen. It contrasted strongly with the Q Class 0-6-0 of 1938, designed by Bulleid's predecessor Richard Maunsell which had been built to essentially Victorian era principles.

Using the minimum amount of raw materials, and with all superfluous features stripped away, he produced in 1942 the most powerful 0-6-0 steam locomotive that has ever run on Britain's railways. Prodigiously powerful and extremely light, the forty Q1s formed the backbone of the Southern's heavy freight capability. The engine weighed in at under 52 tons, and could be used over more than 97% of the Southern Railway's route mileage.

The class was one of several built under the wartime 'Austerity' regime, which stressed pure functionality above any considerations of style or decoration. This explains their (to many) bizarre appearance. One aspect of their shape was that (like the same designer's "West Country" and "Merchant Navy" classes) they could be simply driven through a coach-washer for cleaning at a time when manpower for this time-consuming chore could not be spared.

They not only thrived during the War, they were retained in service until the 1960s, which saw the end of steam operations on Britain's railways. Whilst they remained primarily freight locomotives, they were also frequently used on secondary passenger services.

Bulleid numbered the engines (using the UIC classification system) C1 to C40, but they were later renumbered after nationalisation into British Railways' standard system, and given the numbers 33001 to 33040. BR classified them as power classification 5F: no other 0-6-0 exceeded 4F.

The Q1 was the last class of 0-6-0 main line steam locomotive ever built in Britain. Later designs of medium-powered freight locomotives such as the LMS Ivatt Class 2 2-6-0 and LMS Ivatt Class 4 (which were themselves later developed into British Railways standard types) all followed a 2-6-0 wheel arrangement.




AlanL
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England - East Anglia, United Kingdom
Joined: August 12, 2005
KitMaker: 14,499 posts
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Posted: Friday, August 04, 2006 - 12:46 AM UTC
link to Wikipedia for further information:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SR_Class_Q1

Cheers

Al
TUGA
#034
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Setubal, Portugal
Joined: April 26, 2002
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Posted: Friday, August 04, 2006 - 01:48 AM UTC
Hi,


Quoted Text

... Now you wizards - what's 4ft 8+1/2ins in 1/35 ??????



1 ft =12 ins As far as I remember. It's that right ?

So 4ft = 48 ins +8.5 = 56.5 ins


56.5 ins at 1/1 = 41 mm (milimeters) at 1/35, according to Eagle's calculator.

HTH
Grumpyoldman
Staff Member_ADVISOR
KITMAKER NETWORK
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Florida, United States
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Posted: Friday, August 04, 2006 - 05:14 AM UTC
According to Murphy's rule..... 41mm..... :-)
AlanL
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England - East Anglia, United Kingdom
Joined: August 12, 2005
KitMaker: 14,499 posts
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Posted: Friday, August 04, 2006 - 12:51 PM UTC
Greetings all,

Well that's agreed then 41mm it is.

Now where's that ruler!!!!! :-) :-) :-) :-)

What we need now are some colour photos of Southern Railway Livery for their goods wagons and some examples and thoughts about the differences between them and what's available in 1/35?????

Any takers?????

Cheers

Al

edit: there seem to be two kts that migh be useful if they are reasonably close to British rolling stock pr could be altered somewhat, the 6086 Railway Gondola and the 6085 Railway Flatbed both by Dragon. Are there any othres???

Cheers

Al
old-dragon
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Illinois, United States
Joined: August 30, 2005
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Posted: Saturday, August 05, 2006 - 04:01 AM UTC
Just one bunky...the DML #6069 schwerer platform wagon typ SSy. This kit comes with the track base...the DML gondola and machinegun flatbed kits "do not come with track"! {we opened up both the boxes @ my not-so-local hobby shop to find out cause no one knew...now we all do!}
Other DML railway pieces;
#6073 schwerer panzerwagon-artilleriewagon{panzer turret zersion}{comes with track}
#9049 panzerspahwagon {rail version}{comes with track}
-there's a command version of the #6073 kit but it has a fixed top{comes with track}{kit number escapes me...I have the others so it's easy to know the numbers.}
I got the RPM track section kit friday...smaller code or gauge from the looks of it...but for $6...
I need to find DML's track section kit{s}...OOP though!
Give me alittle bit and I'll assemble DML's track and tell you what it measures up @...spose you'll want metric measurement of that ,huh?
AlanL
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England - East Anglia, United Kingdom
Joined: August 12, 2005
KitMaker: 14,499 posts
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Posted: Saturday, August 05, 2006 - 04:26 AM UTC
Hi Bob,

Yip, would like to know the gauge of the DML track.

I've been thinking about using Evergreen plastic I Beams as suggested by Jan, as most of my track will be sunk into the pier but it would be interesting to know the measurement details of the German rails to see if there is any difference as part of the line may be on sleepers.

The flatbed and the gondola are the only two realistic options for me but again I need a comparison with similar British Rolling Stock, to see what would have to be altered.

At least I know the Railway Company to use, Southern Rail, and have seem some models showing their livery and found some not too good pictures showing where the marking on the flat bed would go, so things are moving along slowly and progress is being made.

Thanks for the heads up on the kits, I'll need track then for sure.

Cheers

Al

old-dragon
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Illinois, United States
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Posted: Saturday, August 05, 2006 - 04:29 AM UTC
OK, DML track measured{had to start dinner 1st}. This is ID between rails folks.
Got 1 5/8in{1.640} before any deflection and 41.66mm for those of us going by the metric scale.
Any other specs you'd like of the DML track?

I could see use of small code g scale rail sections, large code o scale, or old school 3/8in I-beam stock with a cap and bottom flange...ideas?
AlanL
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England - East Anglia, United Kingdom
Joined: August 12, 2005
KitMaker: 14,499 posts
Historicus Forma: 140 posts
Posted: Saturday, August 05, 2006 - 05:02 AM UTC
Hi Bob,

41.66mm is close enough for me if I need to use it. Thanks for that.

Regarding all he other stuff it's double dutch to me, apart from the I Beams for which Jan said he used 3/16 (4.8mm). LOL, LOL :-) :-) .

Now sit down and enjoy your dinner

Cheers

Al